Understanding Tiny House Dimensions: A Comprehensive Guide

Understanding Tiny House Dimensions

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When planning to build a tiny house, understanding the dimensions is crucial. The dimensions of your tiny house will not only determine the space you have to live in but also the regulations you need to comply with, especially if you plan to move your tiny house. This article will delve into the common dimensions for tiny houses, the regulations and legal constraints you need to be aware of, and how innovative design can help you make the most of small spaces.

TopicDetails
Common Dimensions for Tiny HousesHeight: Up to 13.5 feet; Width: Up to 8.5 feet; Length: Up to 30 feet
Regulations and Legal ConstraintsDOT regulations: Maximum size for tiny houses on trailers; State regulations: Vary by state, may affect size and need for special permit; CDL requirements: Needed if tiny house on trailer is over a gross vehicle weight (GVW) of 26,000 lbs
Innovative Design for Small SpacesUtility Trailer: Common sizes – 8×20, 8×24, 8×30; Gooseneck Trailer: Common sizes – 8.5×26, 8.5×36; Deck Over Trailer: Common sizes – 8.5×20, 8.5×24, 8.5×30; 10-Foot-Wide Trailer: Common sizes – 10×26, 10×30
Key dimensions for Tiny Homes

Common Dimensions for Tiny Houses

Tiny House Made Easy™

Tiny houses, whether built on a trailer or on the ground, have certain common dimensions. These dimensions are largely governed by the Department of Transportation (DOT) if you’re building your tiny house on a trailer.

  • Height: Most bridges on major highways and many side roads are built to have a clearance of at least 13.5 feet. Therefore, you’ll want to consider building your tiny house just shy of that to be on the safe side.
  • Width: In most states, if you’re building your tiny house on a trailer, it needs to be less than 8.5 feet wide or you’ll need a special wide load permit.
  • Length: The length of your tiny house can be up to 30 feet long. However, the length of your tiny house is also determined by your tow vehicle. In most cases, your maximum length will be 53 feet minus the length of your truck.

When building a tiny house, it’s important to be aware of the regulations and legal constraints that apply. These regulations can vary from state to state, so it’s important to check the specific regulations in your area.

  • DOT Regulations: The Department of Transportation (DOT) sets the maximum size for tiny houses on trailers. If your tiny house exceeds these dimensions, you may require special permits and a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) driver.
  • State Regulations: Each state may have its own regulations regarding the size and weight of tiny houses. These regulations can affect the size of your tiny house and whether you need a special permit to move it.
  • CDL Requirements: If your tiny house on a trailer is over a gross vehicle weight (GVW) of 26,000 lbs, you’ll require a CDL driver.

Innovative Design for Small Spaces

Designing a tiny house requires innovative thinking to make the most of the small space. Here are some common types of trailers used for building tiny houses and their

Innovative Design for Small Spaces

Designing a tiny house requires innovative thinking to make the most of the small space. Here are some common types of trailers used for building tiny houses and their dimensions.

Tiny House Trailer Types
  • Utility Trailer: The most common trailer style to use is a utility style trailer. These are sometimes referred to as “bumper pull” or a “drop axle trailer.” Common sizes include 8 feet x 20 feet, 8 feet x 24 feet, and 8 feet x 30 feet.
  • Gooseneck Trailer: A gooseneck trailer uses a fifth wheel attachment point to tow with and is characterized by the hitch going up, over, then down again for towing. Common sizes include 8.5 feet x 26 feet and 8.5 feet x 36 feet.
  • Deck Over Trailer: A deck over trailer isn’t too popular because of how much vertical height you sacrifice, eating into your inside dimensions for living space. However, some people like this style of trailer because it makes for a simpler building process where you don’t have to worry about building around wheel wells. Common sizes include 8.5 feet x 20 feet, 8.5 feet x 24 feet, and 8.5 feet x 30 feet.
  • 10-Foot-Wide Trailer: These trailers don’t differ too much from the above style trailer other than measuring 10 feet wide or more. If you decide go with a tiny house that is 10 feet wide, you’ll need to have a special oversized permit to transport it. Common sizes include 10 feet x 26 feet and 10 feet x 30 feet.

When designing your tiny house, it’s important to consider the type of trailer that will best suit your needs. The type of trailer you choose will affect the amount of space you have to work with and how easy it is to transport your tiny house.

A video about the maximum legal dimensions of tiny homes

Conclusion

In conclusion, understanding the dimensions of a tiny house is crucial for planning and designing your home. By considering the common dimensions, regulations, and innovative design options, you can create a tiny house that is perfect for your needs.