Are Tiny Homes Legal in North Carolina?

North Carolina Flag
TopicDetails
Tiny Home LegalityVaries by town, city, or county
Foundation vs. WheelsFoundation-based tiny homes are legal; houses on wheels cannot be primary residences
Building RequirementsMust comply with the North Carolina Building Code and local zoning regulations
Permit RegulationsPermitting may be required; consult with local authorities
North Carolina Legistaltion Tiny Homes Summary

Amazon Affiliate Disclaimer

This website is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases. We get commissions for purchases made through links in this website.

Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc., or its affiliates.

Please Visit our Privacy Policy for more information about how we collect, use, and protect your personal data.

Tiny homes have gained popularity in recent years, attracting many individuals drawn to the ideas of minimalism and sustainability. As a result, many people are wondering if tiny homes are legal in their respective locations. In this article, we will explore the legality of tiny homes in North Carolina.

Tiny House Made Easy™

Tiny homes are legal in North Carolina, but the definition of a legal tiny home may differ based on the town, city, or county in which you’re building. Tiny homes constructed on foundations are accepted legally as places to live, while tiny homes on wheels are not considered permanent homes for the entire year. Here, we present some additional details about tiny home regulations in North Carolina:

  • A new construction tiny home can be erected on a single lot if it is built on a foundation and meets the North Carolina Building Code or must be certified under the NC Modular Construction Program standards for single-family homes.
  • Many areas in North Carolina require a permit for zoning and permitting. Consult with your local authorities and ask what they require. You may need to apply for a variance or conditional use permit to begin your project for tiny houses or conversions.
  • Tiny homes are acceptable as permanent single-family dwellings in North Carolina, provided they meet certain minimum requirements.
  • The tiny living movement is very popular in North Carolina, but there are more regulations, building codes, and zoning restrictions to adhere to than in some other states. For example, North Carolina does not allow a house on wheels to be a primary residence, and these can only be used as temporary living spaces.

Building a Tiny Home in North Carolina

In order to build a tiny home in North Carolina, there are specific rules and regulations that need to be followed. Here are some of the guidelines and requirements:

Administrative Requirements

  • Must be permitted by the local building official having jurisdiction over the building.
  • Plumbing fixtures must be connected to an approved sewage disposal method, and North Carolina does not allow storage tanks.

Minimum Size Requirements

  • Tiny homes must have at least 150 square feet for the first dweller and an additional 100 square feet per additional occupant.
  • A dwelling is considered a tiny home when it is constructed with at least 320 square feet of floor area, and the tiny home square footage typically does not exceed 1000.

Building Codes

  • Tiny homes must abide by additional housing ordinances.
  • All projects are reviewed for compliance with the Raleigh development code and North Carolina state building code.

Permits

  • Many areas in North Carolina require a permit for zoning and permitting. Consult with your local authorities and ask what they require. You may need to apply for a variance or conditional use permit to begin your project for tiny houses or conversions.
  • All projects are reviewed for compliance with the Raleigh development code and North Carolina state building code. Before submitting an application, you need to prepare application materials, submittal instructions, project review and permitting, and paying fees.

It is important to note that tiny homes are legal in North Carolina, but the definition of a legal tiny home may differ based on town, city, or county. Therefore, it is essential to consult with your local authorities and ask what they require before building your tiny home.