Are Tiny Homes Legal in Arizona?

Arizona Flag From Wikipedia
Tiny Homes in Arizona
Legal StatusLegal, subject to zoning regulations and area-specific building codes.
Friendly CitiesPhoenix, Sedona, Flagstaff, Pima County, and Lakeside.
Building StandardsA tiny house is defined as a house smaller than 600 square feet and is site-built only. Tiny houses built on a foundation must have ceilings 6’4’’ tall. Tiny homes must meet the same building codes as a regular single-family home, but with a couple of exceptions.
Minimum Habitable SpaceFloor area of 400 square feet or below, without including the lofts. Structures built on trailers must be more than 160 square feet.
Certificate of OccupancyMust follow the zoning regulations and area-specific building codes. A county official must inspect the tiny house after completing construction to ensure that it is built to code.
Tiny Homes on Wheels (THOWs)Allowed in certain zones of the county and must meet specific requirements.
Plumbing and Electrical SystemsTiny permanent homes must meet plumbing ventilation regulations and have smoke detectors. A minimum of 125 Amp electrical service is required. In urban areas, there may be additional requirements due to Fire Ordinances and municipal sewage system connections.

Amazon Affiliate Disclaimer

This website is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases. We get commissions for purchases made through links in this website.

Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc., or its affiliates.

Please Visit our Privacy Policy for more information about how we collect, use, and protect your personal data.

Tiny homes are legal in Arizona, but they are subject to specific zoning regulations. Zoning regulations in Arizona permit tiny homes in multifamily house zones, detached single-family areas, or areas meant for accessory dwelling units (ADUs). Moreover, tiny homeowners are allowed to have shared areas such as a shared kitchen, wash area, swimming pools, heated pools, or community gardens. Tiny homeowners also share other utilities like electricity, water, and Wi-Fi.

Tiny House Made Easy™

Cities in Arizona that are particularly friendly towards tiny homes include Phoenix, Sedona, Flagstaff, Pima County, and Lakeside. However, if you’re planning to permanently live in a tiny house in Arizona, you must follow the zoning regulations and area-specific building codes. Additionally, a Certificate of Occupancy is required.

What are the building codes for tiny homes in Arizona?

In Arizona, a tiny house is defined as a dwelling smaller than 600 square feet and is site-built only. It should not be smaller than 200 square feet. Tiny houses built on a foundation must have ceilings at least 6’4’’ tall. Tiny permanent homes must have an emergency exit on the roof, one room as a bedroom, and meet plumbing ventilation regulations. They must also have smoke detectors and get inspected and approved by a county official before use.

Tiny houses shall be built and inspected in accordance with the 2018 IRC Appendix Q. Furthermore, tiny homes must meet the same building codes as a regular single-family home, but with a couple of exceptions. It’s important to note that building codes and regulations can differ by county, so checking with local authorities before building a tiny home is essential.

Are there any specific requirements for plumbing and electrical systems in tiny homes in Arizona?

Yes, there are specific requirements for plumbing and electrical systems in tiny homes in Arizona. Tiny permanent homes must meet plumbing ventilation regulations and have smoke detectors. They must also get inspected and approved by a county official before use. Additionally, a minimum of 125 Amp electrical service is required for tiny homes in Arizona.

In urban areas, you may not be able to go completely off-grid because of Fire Ordinances that require you to have running water at a certain pressure. Some cities may also require you to connect to the municipal sewage system if it is located near your property. Therefore, it is essential to check with the local authorities before building a tiny home to ensure that you meet all the plumbing and electrical requirements.

Conclusion

While tiny homes are legal in Arizona, there are specific zoning regulations and building codes that must be adhered to. Depending on the location and specifications of the tiny home, requirements can vary. It’s important to consult with local authorities to get the most accurate and up-to-date information before embarking on your tiny home journey.